25. Mai 2012 · Kommentare deaktiviert für Studie zur Überwachung der EU Außengrenzen · Kategorien: Algerien, Balkanroute, Frankreich, Griechenland, Italien, Libyen, Malta, Marokko, Mauretanien, Mittelmeerroute, Sahara, Spanien, Syrien, Tunesien, Türkei · Tags: ,

Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung: Borderline. EU Border Surveillance Initiatives. An Assessment of the Costs and Its Impact on Fundamental Rights

A research paper written by Dr. Ben Hayes / Mathias Vermeulen, Berlin, May 2012
http://media.de.indymedia.org/media/2012/05//330401.pdf

Preface

The  upheavals  in  North  Africa  have  lead  to  a  short‐term  rise  of  refugees  to  Europe,  yet, demonstrably, there has been no wave of refugees heading for Europe. By far most refugees have found shelter in neighbouring Arab countries. Nevertheless, in June 2011, the EU’s heads of state precipitately passed a resolution with far‐reaching consequences, one that will result in new border
policies “protecting” the Union against migration. In addition to new rules and the re‐introduction of
border controls within the Schengen  Area, the heads of state  also insisted  on upgrading the EU’s
external  borders  using  state‐of‐art  surveillance  technology,  thus  turning  the  EU  into  an  electronic
fortress.

The resolution passed by the representatives of EU governments aims to quickly put into place the
European surveillance system EUROSUR. This is meant to enhance co‐operation between Europe’s
border control agencies and promote the surveillance of the EU’s external borders by FRONTEX, the
Union’s  agency  for  the  protection  of  its  external  borders,  using  state‐of‐the‐art  surveillance
technologies. To achieve this, there are even plans to deploy unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) over
the Mediterranean and the coasts of North Africa. Such high‐tech missions have the aim to spot and
stop refugee vessels even before they reach Europe’s borders. A EUROSUR bill has been drafted and
is presently being discussed in the European Council and in the European Parliament.
Member  states  also  want  to  introduce  so‐called  “smart  borders”  to  achieve  total  control  over  all
cross‐border movements. Following the US model, the plan is to introduce a massive database that
will store information, including fingerprints, of all non‐EU citizens leaving or entering the Union. The
aim is to identify so‐called “over‐stayers,” that is, third‐country nationals who have overstayed their
limited resident permits. In the United States, a similar system has been a failure and nationwide
exit checks were never introduced. Still, the EU’s heads of state and its government representatives
persist – whatever the cost (the EU Commission estimates it will be up to 1.1 billion dollars). Under
pressure from member states, it is trying to introduce the smart borders bill during the summer of
2012.
EUROSUR and “smart borders” represent the EU’s cynical response to the Arab Spring. Both are new
forms of European border controls – new external border protection policies to shut down the influx
of refugees and migrants (supplemented by internal controls within the Schengen Area); to achieve
this,  the  home  secretaries  of  some  countries  are  even  willing  to  accept  an  infringement  of
fundamental rights.
The  present  study  by  Ben  Hayes  and  Mathias  Vermeulen  demonstrates  that  EUROSUR  fosters  EU
policies  that  undermine  the  rights  to  asylum  and  protection.  For  some  time,  FRONTEX  has  been
criticised  for  its  “push  back”  operations  during  which  refugee  vessels  are  being  intercepted  and
escorted  back  to  their  ports  of  origin.  In  February  2012,  the  European  Court  of  Human  Rights
condemned Italy for carrying out such operations, arguing that Italian border guards had returned all
refugees found on an intercepted vessel back to Libya – including those with a right to asylum and
international  protection.  As  envisioned  by  EUROSUR,  the  surveillance  of  the  Mediterranean  using
UAVs, satellites, and shipboard monitoring systems will make it much easier to spot such vessels. It is
Page | 6

to be feared, that co‐operation with third countries, especially in North Africa, as envisioned as part
of EUROSUR, will lead to an increase of “push back” operations.
Nevertheless, the EU’s announcement of EUROSUR sounds upbeat: The planned surveillance of the
Mediterranean, we are being told, using UAVs, satellites, and shipboard monitoring systems, will aid
in the rescue of refugees shipwrecked on the open seas. The present study reveals to what extent
such statements cover up a lack of substance. Maritime rescue services are not part of EUROSUR
and  border  guards  do  not  share  information  with  them,  however  vital  this  may  be.  Only  just
recently,  the  Council  of  Europe  issued  a  report  on  the  death  of  63  migrants  that  starved  and
perished  on  an  unseaworthy  vessel,  concluding  that  the  key  problem  had  not  been  to  locate  the
vessel but ill‐defined responsibilities within Europe. No one came to the aid of the refugees – and
that in spite of the fact that the vessel’s position had been known.
In reaction to the Arab Spring, EU member countries are not only promoting a total surveillance of
the Mediterranean, they are also pushing for an electronic upgrading of border controls. This means
that ordinary travellers, too, will come into the focus of border guards in what one may well call a
data juggernaut. Through its “smart borders” programme the EU would create one of the world’s
largest databases for finger prints – not with the aim to fight terrorism or stem cross‐border crime
(even that would be a questionable endeavour), but solely in order to identify individuals that have
overstayed their limited residency permits.
One of the fundamental findings of the study is that the EU’s new border regime would not only
infringe fundamental rights, it would also, in spite of its questionable benefits, cost billions – and
that against the background of pervasive budget cuts and austerity measures. Above all, this would
profit Europe’s defence contractors, as they would receive EU funding for “smart gates,” UAVs, and
other  surveillance  technologies.  The  technological  upgrading  of  the  EU’s  external  borders  will
obviously open up new markets to European security and armament companies. What we witness is
a  convergence  of  business  interests  and  the  aims  of  political  hardliners  who  view  migration  as  a
threat to the EU’s homeland security.
The EU’s new border control programmes not only represent a novel technological upgrade, they
also show that the EU is unable to deal with migration and refugees. Of the 500,000 refugees fleeing
the  turmoil  in  North  Africa,  less  than  5%  ended  up  in  Europe.  Rather,  the  problem  is  that  most
refugees  are  concentrated  in  only  a  very  few  places.  It  is  not  that  the  EU  is  overtaxed  by  the
problem; it is local structures on Lampedusa, in Greece’s Evros region, and on Malta that have to
bear the brunt of the burden. This can hardly be resolved by labelling migration as a novel threat and
using military surveillance technology to seal borders. For years, instead of receiving refugees, the
German government along with other EU countries has blocked a review of the Dublin Regulation in
the  European  Council.  For  the  foreseeable  future,  refugees  and  migrants  are  to  remain  in  the
countries that are their first point of entry into the Union.
Within  the  EU, the  hostile stance against migrants  has reached  levels that  threaten the rescue of
shipwrecked refugees. During FRONTEX operations, shipwrecked refugees will not be brought to the
nearest port – although this is what international law stipulates – instead they will be landed in a
port of the member country that is in charge of the operation. This reflects a “nimby” attitude – not
in my backyard. This is precisely the reason for the lack of responsibility in European maritime rescue
Page | 7

operations pointed out by the Council of Europe. As long as member states are unwilling to show
more solidarity and greater humanity, EUROSUR will do nothing to change the status quo.
The  way  forward  would  be  to  introduce  improved,  Europe‐wide  standards  for  the  granting  of
asylum. The relevant EU guidelines are presently under review, albeit with the proviso that the cost
of  new  regulations  may  not  exceed  the  cost  of  those  in  place  –  and  that  they  may  not  cause  a
relative  rise  in  the  number  of  asylum  requests.  In  a  rather  cynical  move,  the  EU’s  heads  of
government  introduced  this  proviso  in  exactly  the  same  resolution  that  calls  for  the  rapid
introduction  of  new  surveillance  measures  costing  billions.  Correspondingly,  the  budget  of  the
European Asylum Support Office (EASO) is small – only a ninth what goes towards FRONTEX.
Unable to tackle the root of the problem, the member states are upgrading the Union’s external
borders. Such a highly parochial approach taken to a massive scale threatens some of the EU’s
fundamental values – under the pretence that one’s own interests are at stake. Such an approach
borders on the inhumane.

The research paper “Borderline” examines three new EU border surveillance initiatives: the creation
of a European External Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR); the establishment of an Entry‐Exit
System  (EES);  and  the  creation  of  a  Registered  Traveller  Programme  (RTP).  EUROSUR  promises
increased  surveillance  of  the  EU’s  sea  and  land  borders  using  a  vast  array  of  new  technologies,
including drones (unmanned aerial vehicles), off‐shore sensors, and satellite tracking systems. The
EES would record the movement of people into and out of the Schengen area and extend biometric
ID checks to all non‐EU nationals (including those not currently subject to EU visa requirements) with
the  aim  of  helping  border  guards  identify  “overstayers”.  With  the  proposed  RTP,  third‐country
nationals who have been pre‐vetted and deemed not to pose a security risk to the EU would benefit
from  faster  entry  into  the  Schengen  area.  This  would  rely  on  the  use  of  automated  border  gates
already installed in some European airports. EU policy‐makers and the manufacturers of these gates
hope that this will lead to the roll‐out of so‐called smart borders across the EU.
The EU’s proposals were presented as a response to a perceived “migration crisis” that accompanied
the so‐called Arab Spring of 2011 and the arrival of thousands of Tunisians in France. But in reality
the  policies  have  been  under  development  for  more  than  four  years.  They  are  now  entering  a
decisive phase. The European Parliament has just started negotiating the legislative proposal for the
EUROSUR  system,  and  within  months  the  Commission  is  expected  to  issue  formal  proposals  for
smart borders and the establishment of an EES and RTP.
Taken  together, the  EUROSUR and smart borders package  could  cost in the order of €2 billion or
more. They would result in the gathering of biometric data on millions of travellers, longer waiting
lines at the EU’s external borders, and the establishment of costly new border surveillance systems
in  the  member  states  and  at  FRONTEX,  the  EU  border  agency.  The  European  Commission  has
produced several impact assessments but, according to the report, these have failed to demonstrate
a  pressing  social  need  for  the  new  systems.  The  Commission’s  financial  estimates  have  a  wide
margin of error. EU institutions have failed to take into account the insurmountable difficulties that
the  United  States  has  faced  in  introducing  comparable  systems  (US  VISIT,  which  is  still  unable  to
record the exit of travellers from the United States; and SBINET, a border surveillance system along
the Mexican border that was scrapped after technological problems and exploding costs).
The authors call for a proper public debate about both the need for yet more expensive EU‐wide
databases and surveillance systems in an era of crippling austerity. They also argue that a high‐tech
upgrade to the “Fortress Europe” approach to migration control is a questionable response to what
is largely a humanitarian crisis, with thousands of migrants and refugees dying at sea every year.
The  report  is  also  critical  of  the  decision‐making  process.  Whereas  the  decision  to  establish
comparable EU systems such as EUROPOL and FRONTEX were at least discussed in the European and
national parliaments, and by civil society, in the case of EUROSUR – and to a lesser extent the smart
borders initiative – this method has been substituted for a technocratic process that has allowed for
the development of the system and substantial public expenditure to occur well in advance of the
legislation  now  on  the  table.  Following  five  years  of  technical  development,  the  European
Commission expects to adopt the legal framework and have the EUROSUR system up and running
Page | 9

(albeit in beta form) in the same year (2013), presenting the European Parliament with an effective
fait accomplit.
The EUROSUR system
The stated purpose of EUROSUR is to improve the “situational awareness” and reaction capability of
the member states and FRONTEX to prevent irregular migration and cross‐border crime at the EU’s
external land and maritime borders. In practical terms, the Regulation would extend the obligations
on  Schengen  states  to  conducting  comprehensive  “24/7”  surveillance  of  land  and  sea  borders
designated as high‐risk – in terms of unauthorised migration – and mandate FRONTEX to carry out
surveillance of the Open Seas beyond EU territory and the coasts and ports of northern Africa. The
Commission  has  repeatedly  stressed  EUROSUR’s  future  role  in  “protecting  and  saving  lives  of
migrants”, but nowhere in the proposed Regulation and numerous assessments, studies, and R&D
projects is it defined how exactly this will be done, nor are there any procedures laid out for what
should  be  done  with  the  “rescued”.  In  this  context,  and  despite  the  humanitarian  crisis  in  the
Mediterranean among migrants and refugees bound for Europe, EUROSUR is more likely to be used
alongside  the  long‐standing  European  policy  of  preventing  these  people  reaching  EU  territory
(including  so‐called  push  back  operations,  where  migrant  boats  are  taken  back  to  the  state  of
departure) rather than as a genuine life‐saving tool.
The  EUROSUR system relies on a host of new surveillance technologies and the interlinking of 24
different national surveillance systems and coordination centres, bilaterally and through FRONTEX.
Despite  the  high‐tech  claims,  however,  the  planned  EUROSUR  system  has  not  been  subject  to  a
proper  technological  risk  assessment.  The  development  of  new  technologies  and  the  process  of
interlinking  24  different  national  surveillance  systems  and  coordination  centres  –  bilaterally  and
through FRONTEX – is both extremely complex and extremely costly, yet the only people who have
been  asked  if  they  think  it  will  work  are  FRONTEX  and  the  companies  selling  the  hardware  and
software. The European Commission estimates that EUROSUR will cost €338 million, but its methods
do not stand up to scrutiny. Based on recent expenditure from the EU External Borders Fund, the
framework  research  programme,  and  indicative  budgets  for  the  planned  Internal  Security  Fund
(which will support the implementation of the EU’s Internal Security Strategy from 2014–2020), it
appears  that  EUROSUR  could  easily  end  up  costing  two  or  three  times  more:  as  much  as  €874
million.  Without  a  cap  on  what  can  be  spent  attached  to  the  draft  EUROSUR  or  Internal  Security
Fund legislation, the European Parliament will be powerless to prevent any cost overruns. There is
no  single  mechanism  for  financial  accountability  beyond  the  periodic  reports  submitted  by  the
Commission and FRONTEX, and since the project is being funded from various EU budget lines, it is
already very difficult to monitor what has actually been spent.
In its legislative proposal, the European Commission argues that EUROSUR will only process personal
data on an “exceptional” basis, with the result that minimal attention is being paid to privacy and
data protection issues. The report argues that the use of drones and high‐resolution cameras means
that much more personal data is likely to be collected and processed than is being claimed. Detailed
data protection safeguards are needed, particularly since EUROSUR will form a part of the EU’s wider
Common Information Sharing Environment (CISE), under which information may be shared with a
whole range of third actors, including police agencies and defence forces. They also call for proper
supervision  of  EUROSUR,  with  national  data  protection  authorities  checking  the  processing  of
Page | 10

personal data by the EUROSUR National Coordination Centres, and the processing of personal data
by  FRONTEX,  subject  to  review  by  the  European  Data  Protection  Supervisor.  EUROSUR  also
envisages the exchange of information with “neighbouring third countries” on the basis of bilateral
or multilateral agreements with member states, but the draft legislation expressly precludes such
exchanges where third countries could use this information to identify persons or groups who are at
risk of being subjected to torture, inhuman and degrading treatment, or other fundamental rights
violations. The authors argue that it will be impossible to uphold this provision without the logging
of all such data exchanges and the establishment of a proper supervisory system.
Smart borders
Whereas  the  EUROSUR  system  focusses  on  unauthorised  border  crossings,  the  smart  borders
proposals are supposed to enhance checks on third‐country nationals coming to the EU. Specifically,
the proposed Entry‐Exit System is supposed to identify and prevent overstayers, that is, persons who
entered the EU legally with a valid travel document and/or visa, but who became “illegal migrants”
when their legal entitlement to stay expired. According to the European Commission, this category
of migrants constitutes the largest group of “illegal immigrants” in the EU. The EES would work by
registering the time and place of entry and exit of third‐country nationals in order to verify their exit
and/or identify them if they have “overstayed”. In this case, an alert would automatically be sent to
relevant  national  authorities.  The  ESS  plans  the  creation  of  a  centralised  European  database  that
would include biometric data such as fingerprints and facial images from all third‐country nationals
entering the Schengen area. Data gathering on such a large scale is only legal and legitimate if there
are  compelling  reasons  that  concern  public  safety  or  public  order.  The  authors  argue  that  the
European Commission has failed to demonstrate the necessity of such data gathering.
The  authors  also  argue  that  since  there  are  many  perfectly  legal  explanations  as  to  why  people
overstay,  an  EES  alert  could  never  result  in  automatic  sanctions.  An  alert  could  only  constitute  a
presumption  of  illegal  residence,  and  a  follow‐up  (administrative)  procedure  would  always  be
needed to determine whether a person has the right to stay legally in the EU or not. Thus, at best,
the EES could only ever assist border guards in carrying out passenger checks; current claims that the
EES would lead to an increase in the detection and return of “illegal immigrants” are unfounded.
There is also a lack of reliable evidence supporting the effectiveness and the efficiency of entry‐exit
systems at the national level and outside the EU.

An  EU  EES  would  also  result  in  significantly  increased  waiting  times  for  third‐country  nationals
wanting to enter the Schengen area. Whereas third‐country nationals subject to a visa requirement
are already required to provide biometric data on entry, those on the so‐called white list, who do
not require an advance visa, are exempt from this requirement. Extrapolating from border‐crossing
statistics  collected  during  a  comprehensive  monitoring  exercise  in  2009,  this  could  result  in  the
annual  fingerprinting  of  an  additional  57  million  “white  list”  third‐country  nationals.  An  earlier
impact  assessment  stated  that,  on  average,  15  seconds  were  added  to  entry  procedures  in  the
United States when biometrics were introduced to its US VISIT programme. If the EU were able to
achieve  this  target  with  regard  to  57  million  third‐country  nationals,  this  would  still  add  the
equivalent of 27 years of queuing time per year at EU borders! The Commission proposes to “offset”
these additional constraints on cross‐border travel by establishing a Registered Traveller Programme
that  enables  pre‐vetted  individuals  to  cross  borders  much  faster   than  their  unregistered

counterparts.  However,  the  Commission  has  also  estimated  that  only  4  to  5 million  travellers  per
year might actually use an EU RTP, out of an estimated 100 million third‐country nationals entering
the  Schengen  area  every  year.  While  it  would  almost  certainly  make  life  easier  for  business
travellers, an EU RTP would clearly not facilitate travel for the vast majority of travellers or relieve
existing pressure at Schengen’s external borders.

According to the European Commission, the cost of developing the central EES and RTP could be in
the order of €400 million, plus annual operating costs of €190 million per year for the first five years.
Despite the absence of any draft legislation, or even an agreement in principle on introducing smart
borders in the EU, the Commission has already allocated €1.1 billion to the development of an EES
and RTP from the proposed EU Internal Security Fund (2013–2020). The authors of the study argue
that it is unwise that the EU is even considering embarking on another large‐scale IT system before
the  Visa  Information  System  and  Schengen  Information  System  II  have  been  successfully
implemented.  Assuming  that  the  effectiveness  of  these  two  systems  can  be  demonstrated,  the
Commission will still have a long way to go to demonstrate the need for smarter borders.

Preface ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5
Executive Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8
1
Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12
2
Towards “smart borders” in the European Union? …………………………………………………….. 13
2.1
EUROSUR: European External Border Surveillance System ………………………………………….. 13
2.1.1 The EUROSUR roadmap ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 16
2.1.2 The draft EUROSUR Regulation ……………………………………………………………………………….. 18
2.1.3 Beyond border control: integrated maritime surveillance …………………………………………… 20
2.2
The EU “smart borders” initiative …………………………………………………………………………….. 26
2.2.1 Entry‐exit system …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 28
2.2.2 EES relationship to existing EU systems: VIS and SIS II ………………………………………………… 30
2.2.3 Registered Traveller Programme ……………………………………………………………………………… 32
3
The fundamental rights impact of the EUROSUR and EU “smart border” initiatives ……….. 35
3.1
The right to privacy and the protection of personal data …………………………………………….. 36
3.1.1 EUROSUR ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 36
3.1.1.1 The need for safeguards …………………………………………………………………………………………. 39
3.1.2 Smart borders ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 41
3.1.2.1 The need for safeguards …………………………………………………………………………………………. 42
3.2
Interference with the right to asylum ……………………………………………………………………….. 44
3.2.1 EUROSUR ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 44
3.2.2 Entry‐exit system …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 46
4
Cost, necessity, and effectiveness ……………………………………………………………………………. 47
4.1
Feasibility studies and cost estimates ……………………………………………………………………….. 47
4.1.1 EUROSUR ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 48
4.1.2 Entry‐Exit System and Registered Traveller Programme ……………………………………………… 51
4.2
Border security and the European Security Research Programme ……………………………….. 53
4.2.1 EU funded R&D projects supporting EUROSUR ………………………………………………………….. 56
4.2.2 Space‐based border surveillance and the Common Information Sharing Environment …… 61
4.2.3 EU funded R&D projects supporting smart borders ……………………………………………………. 63
4.3
Funding the implementation of EUROSUR and smart borders …………………………………….. 64
4.3.1 The EU External Borders Fund …………………………………………………………………………………. 64
4.3.2 The Development Cooperation Instrument ………………………………………………………………. 65
4.3.3 The Internal Security Fund ………………………………………………………………………………………. 66
4.4
The United States’ experience: SBI‐net and US VISIT ………………………………………………….. 67
5
Conclusions …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 68
5.1
EUROSUR ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 69
5.2
Smart borders ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 72
6
Recommendations …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 74
6.1
The broader EU migration policy framework …………………………………………………………….. 74
6.2
EUROSUR ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 74
6.3
Entry‐Exit System and Registered Traveller Programme ……………………………………………… 75
Authors ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 77
Page | 3

List of Figures and Boxes
Figure 1: EUROSUR in action ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17
Figure 2: “Operational nodes” in the Common Pre‐Frontier Intelligence Picture ………………………….. 20
Figure 3: EUROSUR and the Common Information Sharing Environment…………………………………….. 21
Figure 4: “Policy options” for funding EUROSUR ………………………………………………………………………. 50
Figure 5: Estimated EUROSUR costs: National Coordination Centres and FRONTEX ……………………… 50
Figure 6: Estimated costs of the RTP and EES systems by the Commission ………………………………….. 52
Figure 7: Achieving border security in the EU …………………………………………………………………………… 55
Figure 8: Cost of establishing, upgrading, and maintaining NCCs 2011–2026 ………………………………. 65
Figure 9: Questioning the EUROSUR cost estimates …………………………………………………………………. 71

Box 1: The EUROSUR roadmap ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16
Box 2: EUROSUR – A system of systems ………………………………………………………………………………….. 23
Box 3: The Visa Information System and the Schengen Information System/SIS II ……………………….. 31
Box 4: EU security research projects supporting EUROSUR ……………………………………………………….. 57
Box 5: GMES projects supporting EUROSUR …………………………………………………………………………….. 61

Ähnliche Beiträge

Kommentare geschlossen.